Lucid Culture

JAZZ, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND THE ARTS IN NEW YORK CITY

Concert Review: Sam Sherwin at R Bar, NYC 6/3/10

Sam Sherwin is a guy whose time has come. Actually, his time never went away – the southpaw guitarslinger has always had a gig, whether playing lead with someone else (most memorably with late 90s/early zeros New York noir rock legends DollHouse) or fronting his own band. But with 80s music in vogue more than it ever might have been during that decade, it’s somewhat surprising that there’s a style of music from that era that hasn’t been resurrected yet. On one level, that’s to be expected: the indie rock trendoids who worship that stuff the most are a fearful crowd and shy away from anything that wasn’t popular to begin with. But for those willing to do a little digging, the strain of powerpop that was coming out of New York in the late 70s and early 80s, with its Gotham sarcasm and just enough of a punk edge to give it a leg up on the tamer stuff coming out of other parts of the world, is overdue for a resurrection. That’s what Sam Sherwin plays.

Playing Telecaster and backed by an inspired trio of Jimmy Buffett keyboardist Pete Vitalone, Bernie Worrell sidewoman Donna McPherson on bass and Dena Tauriello on drums, Sherwin’s baritone croon was part menace and part leer, evoking Iggy Pop in his most off-center phase from the days of albums like Soldier or Party. The set mixed songs from his upcoming album Iodine Cocktails along with tracks from his previous cd Dirty Little Secrets. The second song of the night, a snide slide guitar shuffle was a perfect example. Vitalone got up from his piano and strapped on an accordion for a surprisingly direct, even wounded version of the kiss-off ballad You Got It Wrong, from Dirty Little Secrets. A new, bluesy rocker with an early 80s Stones feel possibly titled Long Time Coming could have been an outtake from Emotional Rescue; another one in a similar vein had Sherwin snarling about “licking my wounds at the scene of the crime.” They slowed down the jailhouse rocker Sittin’ on a Bench (a vivid Rikers Island narrative, probably because it’s a true story) with some ominously echoing Rhodes piano; the darkly bucolic, backbeat-driven number they followed with shifted into urban noir territory without missing a beat. They closed with the catchy powerpop anthem Get Close, a showcase for Vitalone’s majestic organ work. Watch this space for information on the upcoming album.

Advertisements

October 8, 2008 - Posted by | concert, Live Events, Music, music, concert, New York City, review, Reviews, rock music | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.