Lucid Culture

JAZZ, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND THE ARTS IN NEW YORK CITY

Song of the Day 1/10/09

Every day, our top 666 songs of alltime countdown continues, one day at a time all the way to #1. Saturday’s is #564.

The Chantays – Pipeline

The original 1963 version of the surf classic is arguably the best, and it’s the electric piano – absent from most every cover version – that makes it. Available everywhere you would expect it to be. If you prefer a vinyl version, the song’s been reissued hundreds of times on compilations: worth a look through the K-Tel albums in the dollar bins at your local used vinyl purveyor. The link above is a video clip from the Lawrence Welk show, if you can believe! Of all the thousands of covers, the completely punked-out, fuzztone Agent Orange version is the best.

January 10, 2009 - Posted by | lists, Lists - Best of 2008 etc., Music, music, concert

7 Comments »

  1. Just discovered your site. It is truly fantastic. What a service you are providing!
    All the best.
    Ray

    Comment by Ray Beckerman | January 10, 2009 | Reply

  2. By the way, I quoted a passage from your “About” page on my own blog, including the following sentence:

    “By all means, please continue to support your favorite independent bands and artists by purchasing their albums (and please refrain from putting their stuff up online where any moron can download it for nothing).”

    Several of my readers persuasively disagreed with the part in parentheses, saying:

    “By all means, please continue to support your favorite independent bands and artists by purchasing their albums (and please refrain from putting their stuff up online where any moron can download it for nothing).

    I second the first part of that statement, but don’t agree with the stuff between ( )!
    How are those independent bands and artists are supposed to built a fan base if it would not be also via a “moron download” possibility for free?

    Anyone here heard about Skyla Burrell Blues Band for example?
    If not then see:
    #59. [x] Skyla Burrell Blues Band – 09-13 2006
    #64. [x] kdsde – 09-13 2006
    and some following post counts between her and “the pirates”

    http://thepiratebay.org/blog/40

    So I think if someone found an independent band or artist that one loves he should put it up for “morons to download” (together with a link to the micromoney payment system that the band/artist hopefully has set up on their homepage of course! If the band does not have such a thing, that’s their fault then and not of the persons that like to explore new stuff via “moron download” instead of FM/AM for example)”

    I’m not much of a businessman, so I can’t really say, but I think they make a very valid point.

    Comment by Ray Beckerman | January 11, 2009 | Reply

  3. Ray – you raise many valid points. Certainly no harm done by downloading anything by an artist on a major record label, the majors doing everything they can to rip off the artists and ensure they receive no royalties after the initial advance. It’s also inarguably true that downloading has helped build awareness just as commercial radio used to, but hasn’t for well over a decade. By the same token, I can’t count the times an independent artist has told me, “[sigh] I found my album on sendspace, I guess I’ll never be able to sell those 1000 cd’s I spent all my savings to press.” Many of those independent artists – the kind of acts we typically review here – actually rely on cd sales, if only to finance the cost of the next recording.

    Let’s face it – no matter what ethical qualms we may or may not have, we all download stuff. Is it ethical for us to have a sense of entitlement when it comes to free stuff from bands? Yes and no, I think. If you search limewire for many independent artists, you won’t find anything up there, either because they’re too obscure or their fan base is too loyal to post anything. By the same token, I think it behooves artists to reward their fans for their loyalty with free stuff. Demos, live tracks, even whole concerts (archive.org is a fabulous place to put that stuff).

    Personally, I believe that Skyla Burrell’s post at the piratebay blog is over the top. But there’s some truth at the heart of her argument. Certainly nothing wrong with anybody sending his or her friends mp3s, burning cds or mixes; I just think it’s too bad when an artist can’t put out that second cd they wanted so badly to record but now can’t afford to.

    I think we’re seeing a real paradigm shift: if you really want to be a musician, that means you have to focus on being a live act. Which means going back to the roots of what music has been throughout the whole of history until just over a hundred years ago. And I don’t see anything wrong with that.

    Comment by lc | January 11, 2009 | Reply

  4. Thanks for the illuminating and thoughtful response.

    Comment by Ray Beckerman | January 11, 2009 | Reply

  5. I’d like to dig a little deeper on this topic, if I may. Let’s have independent artists adopt an approach that starts with licensing their works under Creative Commons. Next, let’s have every bar and restaurant and curio shop in America be able to bundle artists’ works for themselves. In other words, have artists add their works to bundles on web sites for these owners to purchase directly.

    Policing can be as easy as verifying by patrons that the owner is supporting a particular bundle. Fans can then notify artists of violations, and artists can then contact and discuss things with the owners.

    If I’m an owner of a bar or shop, I’m going to want the bundle my competitor is using, if that competitor is drawing patrons, eh?

    As technology advances, we’ll see rural communities using such bundles as part of their farmer’s markets, their community events, etc. The Internet allows everyone to participate, and artists don’t have to rely on labels. One further note. If I have a camera, and make a video, music for my video is important. Every youtube video needs just the right music. Where better to market one’s music than by explicitly encouraging fans to use their music in videos?

    Comment by tompoe | January 11, 2009 | Reply

  6. I think the whole idea of ASCAP, et al. policing bars and coffee shops is total bullshit (did you hear about the Irish pub in Rhode Island who got hit with a $18,000 ASCAP bill and may go out of business as a result). I have to pay because I plug in my ipod to keep the customers drinking? I also don’t see any sense in charging people for making youtube videos. Creative Commons? Yes yes yes. It’s all gonna be live one day or another, sooner or later the whole internet is gonna just be dominated by a few corporations just like what happened with tv in the 50s. Enjoy it while it lasts.

    Comment by delarue | January 11, 2009 | Reply

  7. Yes, I was VERY upset at the Pirate Bay folks. No one wants to address the point that I HAD made free downloads available in tons of places as I believe it or not do understand the value of giving away things in order to get things back…what set me off was the entire CD was uploaded thus taking th control out of my hands! It costs a fortune to run a full time mid-level band and adding in recording costs just make it almost impossible but we survive on our live shows and CD sales.

    I came out so strong because I had read their very rude responses to other previous requests to remove material…they were extremely rude to representatives from CBS, Disney and several others, so I already knew they were not going to be fair or nice, so I treated them the way they treated others….I was out of line with several things I said, I am a musician NOT a diplomat and when it comes to my living and my art I can be very intense.

    Nontheless I take responsibility for comments that I made and at the end of the day learned something.

    Skyla

    Comment by Skyla Burrell | September 22, 2009 | Reply


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