Lucid Culture

JAZZ, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND THE ARTS IN NEW YORK CITY

More Great Billy Bang Sounds From the Archives

When a great jazz musician leaves us, invariably archival recordings begin to surface: some released in a cynical attempt to capitalize on the player’s legacy, some to further cement that legacy. Happily, the newly released History of Jazz in Reverse by the Fab Trio – bassist Joe Fonda, drummer Barry Altschul and the late, great Billy Bang on violin – falls into the latter category. Each of these players made a name for himself in jazz improvisation, but there’s a purposefulness on this 2005 studio session to rival just about any album of carefully planned compositions. Not everything here is a jam – there’s a bright, Asian-tinged homage to Don Cherry by Bang that could pass for a Cherry piece, the violin’s microtonal pizzicato evoking the sound of a koto. And the three vamp their way through the Afro-Cuban standard Chan Chan, which only gets interesting when Altschul decides to mimic a timbales solo – and pulls it off with a mighty grin.

But the juiciest parts of the album are the improvisations. Altschul manages to be everywhere at once, holding the center while leapfrogging, galloping, cartwheeling and expanding the perimeter: it’s an impactful performance, both literally and figuratively. Fonda is the nucleus of this particular isotope, a terse pulse and omnipresent voice of reason when the violin and the drums go machinegunning their way out of the thicket of sound (that reference is deliberate, Bang’s Vietnam War experiences having been such a defining part of his life). The most stunning creation here is the most terse: the trio learned while in the studio that their friend Sam Rivers’ wife Bea had died, so they made up an elegy on the spot, an anguished yet absolutely regal dirge of sorts that’s equal part blues and oldtime spiritual.

The title track makes an interesting journey backwards from free jazz to swing, and then a boogie that Altschul, counterintuitive as always, uses as a graceful exit. Bang’s alternately shivery staccato flurries and blues-drenched minor-key swirls are characteristically chilling and exhilarating, particularly on the opening jam, Homeward Bound, as Fonda and Altschul tiptoe in tandem around them. There’s also the deliciously chromatic, funky, conversational Implications, and From There to Here, the one track that would have been better left on the cutting-room floor since even Bang can’t keep up with its breakneck pace (Fonda quickly finds out that it makes more sense to hit on the “one” rather than walking it, while Altschul deviously plays halfspeed). But that’s a minor quibble with an otherwise intense and often haunting session that reliably challenging Finnish label Tum Records happily saw fit to release.

January 4, 2012 - Posted by | jazz, Music, music, concert, review, Reviews | , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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