Lucid Culture

JAZZ, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND THE ARTS IN NEW YORK CITY

Album of the Day 11/7/10

Hey, did you turn your clocks back an hour? You’ve just earned sixty free sleep minutes! Every day our 1000 best albums of all time countdown continues all the way to #1. Sunday’s album is #814:

Live Yardbirds – Featuring Jimmy Page

Recorded live in New York in the spring of 1968 on the band’s final tour with Chris Dreja on bass and Jimmy Page on guitar (with some help from Keith Relf), first released in 1971, this one’s been reissued several times but always quickly taken out of print since Page has apparently never liked how he played on it. Which is mystifying because this is the best thing he ever recorded. Wild, inspired, and sloppy (isn’t he always?), he bends notes crazily, fires off fast-foward staggering blues runs and burns through a stunningly fluid six-minute open-tuned blues instrumental that’s half bluegrass. The big blues jam happens at the end of side one; the hits are represented by completely unhinged, paint-peeling versions of You’re a Better Man Than I, Heart Full of Soul, Shapes of Things and the best-ever version of Over Under Sideways Down (sorry, Jeff Beck). Johnny Burnette’s Train Kept a-Rolling is closer to Led Zeppelin than anything the Clapton-era Yardbirds ever did; they also rocket through a lickety-split, open-tuned version of the old standard Drinking Muddy Water. But the killer track here is I’m Confused, an early version of Dazed and Confused which benefits as much from Relf’s gruff, casually unaffected vocal as it does Page’s murky, molten metal Middle Eastern riffage. There doesn’t seem to be an official version of this currently in print; vinyl copies of the 70s albums are prized on the collector market. Here’s a random torrent.

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November 7, 2010 Posted by | lists, Music, music, concert, rock music | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CD Review: Mickey Wynne – Running on Empty

We’re late in reviewing this one, but Mickey Wynne’s guitar playing and songwriting defy the ravages of time: the Liverpool-born rock vet delivers vivid, smartly played, smartly written Americana rock. As befits a guy with an Electric Ladyland/Abbey Road Studios pedigree, the song are superbly produced, blending rustic acoustic textures with a savage, electric, early 70s psychedelic bent, guitars swirling, bending, phasing in and out. Perfectly illustrative song: the lush ballad Against All Odds I’ll Do It, with its layers of acoustic guitar and mandolin that build to a big, sweeping crescendo before coming back down again with a majestic grace.

The tour de force here is the fiery, insistent Bush era parable All Quiet on the Eastern Frontier, funky acoustic guitar giving way to macabre, reverb surf guitar on the chorus and an equally nightmarish outro. It could have been an A-list Dire Straits album cut from 1982 or so. The title track is a shapeshifting John Lee Hooker-style blues with sparse, incisive slide guitar accents that morphs into pounding Led Zep style riff-rock; the hallucinatory, reverb-drenched French Blooze evokes recent work by Spottiswoode or Marty Willson-Piper. Wynne plays the usual UK roots music haunts: the 12 Bar, et al.; the live tracks up on Wynne’s site confirm his reputation as a dynamic, intense live performer.

February 24, 2010 Posted by | Music, music, concert, review, Reviews, rock music | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments