Lucid Culture

JAZZ, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND THE ARTS IN NEW YORK CITY

Vivid Hooks in Tricky Tempos from Jason Robinson

Too many albums sound like OK, We Have to Make a Record. You can hear the tension in the takes…or the musicians phoning it in because they haven’t had time to get the songs in their fingers, or develop a chemistry with the rest of the band. Then there are albums like tenor saxophonist Jason Robinson’s new Tyresian Symmetry – recently out from Cuneiform – that have the chemistry and repartee of a good live gig. If the idea of clever improvisation on catchy tunes in 7 meter appeals to you, this is your album.

The obvious inspiration for this band is Henry Threadgill’s Very Very Circus. Marcus Rojas and Bill Lowe (who also plays bass trombone) man the twin tubas, a mighty low end to bolster Drew Gress’ fat bass. The twin trap kits are handled by George Schuller and Ches Smith, a configuration that makes even more sense considering that Robinson is a longtime member of esteemed third-wave roots reggae band Groundation. Liberty Ellman plays guitar; JD Parran contributes his usual multi-reeds, along with Marty Ehrlich on saxes and clarinet.

A bubbling imtroductory tuba conversation, an artfully crescendoing Gress solo and exchanges between reeds and low brass light up the opening cut, Stratum 3. The eleven-minute title track has the catchiness of a straight-up funk song, albeit one in 7/2, individual territories marked by Ehrlich melismatics, Ellman austerity and alternately blippy and screaming Robinson solos. Likewise, Radiate starts out pretty straight-up with a wary Ehrlich melody over tuba harmonies and then sandwiches a long, chirping, squalling Parran bass clarinet solo in the middle of noir funk before Ellman pushes unexpectedly into bluesmetal terrain.

A showcase for memorable lows from Lowe and then Gress, Saros works a semi-circular Ethiopiques groove, Ehrlich playfully needling Robinson as the tenor pulls tensely against the center. A mini-suite, Elbow Grease builds from an expansively clustering solo Robinson intro, to tricky swing and then a densely intertwining yet surprisingly elegant thicket of reeds. Similarly, Corduroy packs a lot into less than seven minutes: low/high ensemble dichotomies, a richly developed Ellman solo that goes from twinkling to allusively lush, hints of apprehension as the low brass rises, and then Lowe flips the script and introduces some wry relief with muted bass trombone. The album ends with a rousing, soaring big band tune, Cosmolographie, with more pairing off between lows and highs, eventually leaving the high reeds to rustle amongst themselves before bringing it up and out in a flurry. The riffs are strong to the point of hummability, no small achievement in music this intricately orchestrated. Reggae may be Robinson’s money gig, but he’s obviously having every bit as much fun with this project. He and the band play the album release show for this one at Shapeshifter Lab in Gowanus on Dec 18. Robinson also plays with Groundation at Highline Ballroom on Nov 7 at around 9; tix are still available.

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November 3, 2012 Posted by | jazz, Music, music, concert, review, Reviews | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Clinic in Smart Jazz Collaboration

Saxophonist Jason Robinson and pianist Anthony Davis have a new duo cd, Cerulean Landscape, out on Clean Feed, their first full-length album together. Richly melodic and often majestic, it’s simply one of the year’s best. The interplay and chemistry here are comfortably intuitive and strikingly collaborative, as you would expect from a couple of good listeners who’ve worked together frequently in the past. It’s less conversational than it is an exchange of ideas. The two share reconnaissance, intelligence and tactics, Davis’ piano sometimes taking on sax voicings with trills and glissandos of its own. Robinson’s aggression sometimes contrasts intensely with Davis’ judicious lyricism; sometimes it’s the other way around. Despite the title, there’s next to no blues here.

The opening track, by Davis, balances soprano sax stretching to break free, Davis’ signature third-stream elegance underneath. Finally Davis gets to cut loose himself and chase the demons away, then they end it on a quietly triumphant note. Someday I’ll Know, a ballad by Jason Sherbundy, lets Robinson flutter around, eventually ushering in a glimmering, terse solo passage from Davis, who takes it down to a modal-tinged apprehension that will recur memorably in places later on here. A study in contrasts, the third track, Viscissitudes, is something of a delayed-reaction call-and-response, frenetic circling sax over deft incisions that Davis eventually abandons and then follows with a similar apprehension. The musicians reverse roles on the unaffectedly magnificent Translucence, Davis’ alto flute treading gingerly while Davis glimmers darkly and insistently, Robinson leaping for a scampering run when Davis finally introduces some rhythm about three-quarters of the way through.

Robinson again plays good cop to Davis’ distantly moody menace on Of Blues and Dreams, complete with overtones flying from the soprano sax and Davis plucking and muting the piano strings. Davis’ shadow-and-surprise sniper attack late in the piece is arguably the high point of the album. After that, a swing tune without bass or drums – neither which seem necessary here, given the robust camaraderie – finally sees Davis taking a page out of Robinson’s bop book and cutting loose. The album winds up much the way it began, Robinson’s tangents extrapolating wildly from Davis’ mysterious home base, the circle expanding as Davis carefully maps out an increasingly playful series of puddlejumps.

Robinson also has two new other albums worth checking out. Cerberus Reigning is the second part of his ongoing solo Cerberus trilogy: it’s just Robinson, his saxes, some loops and a whole slew of effects. Don’t let the Dungeons ‘n Dragons song titles fool you – it’s soulful, lyrical, often very amusingly playful stuff. And his combo album The Two Faces of Janus with a cast including George Schuller, Marty Ehrlich and Rudresh Mahanthappa reaches for the occasional grit that surfaces on Cerberus and takes it up several notches.

December 15, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment