Lucid Culture

JAZZ, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND THE ARTS IN NEW YORK CITY

An Explosive Finale to the One World Symphony’s Season

“When’s the last time you went to a symphonic concert and looked at the program and didn’t see a single date of death?” conductor Sung Jin Hong asked the Chelsea crowd assembled at the One World Symphony‘s concluding concert of the 2013 season this past May 20. Hong had a good point: it’s not often that an established fullsize orchestra programs a whole bill of living composers. Hong designed this one to go out on an explosive note and succeeded spectacularly. While he didn’t address the concert’s politically charged content, the program did: “American Affairs: Great • Atomic • Desire.”

This orchestra is known for surprises, and there were a couple early on that raised the bar almost impossibly high for the rest of the bill. Soprano Adrienne Metzinger went deep into noir cabaret mode for a lurid take of Benjamin Britten’s Funeral Blues, backed with a stalker’s intensity by pianist Gulnara Mitzanova and the orchestra’s first chair bassist, Justin Lee. Soprano Sonya Headlam had a hard act to follow, but ended up raising the roof with a spine-tingling take of Gershwin’s Summertime, the orchestra lush and balmy behind her as she went to the top of her register, adding a tingling mix of overtones and blues as she brought the song to redline with a triumphant crescendo.

Spring-loaded, catlike and looking somewhat feral on the podium, Hong ran the rest of the concert as a suite – he has a Leonard Bernstein-like aptitude for making connections between what at first glance might seem like completely unrelated pieces. Over the evocative, bittersweetly orchestrated ragtime of John Harbison’s The Great Gatsby, Headlam continued with a more subtly vivid song, Where Is the Old Warm World, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s doomed Daisy offering some wistful foreshadowing. Mezzo-soprano Eva Sun then gave voice to the character Myrtle’s plaintive ache as the backdrop grew more contemplatively atmospheric.

Soprano Ashley Becker aired out the moody intensity of two songs from Andre Previn’s score to A Streetcar Named Desire: the uneasy Sea Air, and a sultry take of I Want Magic. From there they segued into two selections from John Adams’ chilling Robert Oppenheimer-inspired Doctor Atomic, Mitzanova returning for a broodingly opaque turn in front of the orchestra singing Am I In Your Light, the atomic scientist’s wife’s lament.

Baritone Douglas Jabara got the most spectacular of the vocal numbers and made the most of it with a gut-wrenchingly intense, anguished take of Batter My Heart, channeling what the composer felt to be Oppenheimer’s dread for the death and destruction his invention was about to cause (and for his legacy no less, it seems) via text from John Donne’s Holy Sonnet XIV. Offstage before the concert, Jabara said that he believed that Oppenheimer knew the sonnet, and he sang it with that kind of bitter certitude, dashing offstage with a dramatic self-effacement as it ended. From there the orchestra took the Bernard Herrmann-esque horror to a logical, shattering conclusion via a bridge written by Hong as a showsstopping percussion feature with the timpani, gongs and bass drum exploding and then lingering in a firestorm of waves for what seemed minutes on end. It captured the catastrophic horror of the explosion over Hiroshima, not to mention the horrific loss of civilian life, more evocatively than words could possibly have expressed.

Hong programmed the world premiere of his own Edge immediately afterward, a bold and potentially suicidal choice given the previous work’s pyrotechnics. That the conductor’s equally haunting narrative – a setting of Sylvia Plath’s final poem, loaded with vengeful Medea references – wasn’t anticlimactic speaks to its power, and the orchestra’s commitment to it. Soprano Sara Paar had only been given a week to learn it, Hong told the crowd, but she brought it to life with a clenched-teeth, angst-fueled focus against shivery layers of glissandos from the strings. Even when the work lightened toward the end – Plath wasn’t going to kill her kids, after all – the mortally wounded atmopshere lingered. Few orchestras would take such a gamble by ending their season on such a dark note; then again, this ensemble has no fear of taking chances.

Advertisements

May 23, 2013 Posted by | classical music, concert, Live Events, Music, music, concert, New York City, review, Reviews | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Attacca Quartet Vanquishes the Elements

“We’re going to get through this together,” Attacca Quartet cellist Andrew Yee reassured the crowd last night at Lincoln Center. The measure of a musician is how well they perform under duress: this group’s trial last night was not by fire, but just the opposite. The atrium space where they were playing was freezing, yet the quartet of Yee, violinists Amy Schroeder and Keiko Tokunaga and violist Luke Fleming muscled up, retuned their instruments between movements as the weather dictated, and turned in an unstoppably valiant performance of Haydn’s Emperor String Quartet followed by a brisk, nimble series of John Adams works.

They opened with the Haydn, which was as much about slowly revealing a depth that’s alwayas surprising as it is about teamwork, with the endless volleys of call-and-response and pass-the-baton. The first movement was assured and lively to the point of maybe being a way for the group to keep warm (Schroeder breathed deeply into her bow hand afterward). The dynamic shifts from the calm of the second to the jauntiness of the third were bright and poised; the arc from an approximation of storminess to a real storm in the fourth, a ride to savor.

Four John Adams works from his seven-part suite Alleged Dances (i.e. whose steps haven’t been invented yet) were next, and the group rose to their many demands: hazy overtones, insistent pizzicato and staccato, artful exchanges of diverging ideas all circling, sometimes hypnotically, sometimes aggressively, around a center. The ensemble closed with the second movement of Adams’ String Quartet, its briskly pulsing agitation getting a precise, knive’s edge performance, chilly early spring bite finally making way for a series of false endings that became irresistible: the audience fell for all of them, and the group had a mutual grinfest going as well.

The Attacca Quartet play from their ongoing cycle of the complete Haydn string quartets this coming Feb 7 at 7 PM at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 65th St. and Central Park West; suggested donation is $10. On March 26 at 8 they’re at the Poisson Rouge playing Adams works, with the composer in attendance.

January 25, 2013 Posted by | classical music, concert, Live Events, Music, music, concert, New York City, review, Reviews | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment