Lucid Culture

JAZZ, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND THE ARTS IN NEW YORK CITY

Fearless Individualism and Fearsome Chops from Trumpeter Jaimie Branch

Trumpeter Jaimie Branch has made a lot of waves with her sepulchral extended technique, which is only one of the many, many weapons in her arsenal. She has a rich, resounding Wadada Leo Smith-like tone and fast fingers on the valves, yet she’s more likely to build a song without words around catchy riffage. In the proud AACM tradition, the native Chicagoan is a rare example of an improviser with a laserlike sense of melody, yet she also isn’t afraid of controlled chaos – and the other kind of chaos too. Her debut album Fly or Die, one of the most entertaining jazz releases of the year so far, is streaming at Bandcamp. She’s playing Roulette tomorrow night, May 4 at 8 PM with her drum-trumpet duo Anteloper and then with the quartet on the new album; advance tix are $18 and still available as of today.

Tomeka Reid’s cello and Jason Ajemian’s bass exchange funky riffs while the bandleader’s terse, bluesy hooks and spine-tingling flurries rise over drummer Chad Taylor’s splattershot shuffle as the opening number, simply titled Theme 001, gets underway. A gorgeous decay, guitarist Matt Schneider plucking his way into the picture, triggers a segue into Meanwhile, a hazy, horizontal intelude where Taylor gets to spin around his kit and keep everybody centered

From there they segue once again, into Theme 002, a catchy, plucky cello tune over Ajemian’s steady, wry vintage ska beat: Lloyd Knibb would be proud to hear what the guy does here. Branch and Reid walk slightly different paths on separate sides of the street

Cornetists Josh Berman and Ben Lamar Gay join Branch for Leaves, in a wistful and then anguished reverb-drenched, twistedly produced call-and-response: the repercussions, everybody milling around uneasily, take up half the track. The Storm draws on downward slides from the strings and emphatic, steady drum work awash in a sea of reverb, Branch untethered and alone but resolute, completely unafraid. The group march their ghostly way out.

Waltzer is not a waltz but a gently marching backdrop for Branch to make a slow trail in from desolation to vintage 50s Miles ebullience, Taylor and Ajemian bubbling as Reid eases her in with a hypnotic stroll. The album’s title track is a sputtering, spacious solo miniature, followed by the catchy, bluesily bustling Theme Nothing: Schneider’s evil waterslide runs are a highlight, as is Taylor’s quasi-Balkan, rat-a-tat rimshot attack behind Branch’s searing rattle. The gentle, nocturnal guitar miniature Back at the Ranch closes the album on an unexpected note. Expect similarly counterintuitive things from this fearlessly individualistic talent in the years to come.

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May 3, 2019 Posted by | jazz, Music, music, concert, review, Reviews | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Stark, Almost Shockingly Catchy String Tunes and Improvisations From Allstar Trio Hear in Now

Violinist Mazz Swift, cellist Tomeka Reid and bassist Silvia Bolognesi all have busy careers as bandleaders, but they also occasionally play in an edgy, often stunningly catchy trio they call Hear in Now. The project is bracingly and deliciously uncategorizable: ostensibly the music is string jazz, and there’s a lot of improvisation, but also more than a hint of Italian folk, the blues and even string metal. Their latest album Not Living in Fear is streaming at Bandcamp. Reid may be airing out any material from it in two sets at the Jazz Gallery on April 26, the first a duo with drummer Tomas Fujiwara, the second with her quartet including Fujiwara, guitarist Mary Halvorson and bassist Jason Roebke. Cover is $25.

The trio open the album with a jam, rising from hints of a stately march to shivery squall…and then Frankenstein looks in the window but keeps going. Leaving Livorno is every bit the lament the title suggests, Bolognesi’s stark bowed lines taking centerstage over a whispery backdrop.

Transiti has a staggered staccato pulse, errie close harmonies and a sharp, acidically emphatic cello solo. Requiem for Charlie Haden is unexpectedly catchy, despite the astringency of the circling strings. The aptly titled Circle is even bouncier, bordering on parlor pop in the same vein as groups like the Real Vocal String Quartet: it’s neat how the group shift from punchy to a balletesque strut.

Bolognesi’s steady bowing anchors the sailing melody overhead in the miniature Billions and Billions, another strikingly direct, catchy number. Swift sings the album’s title cut, its message of indomitability set to keening high string harmonies and plucky chords over growly bass.

The album’s second improvisation, interestingly, is just as memorable, waltzing intricately around a circling, blues-tinged hook. Terrortoma is the most darkly bluesy track, with its tight, bracing haronies. The longing in Prayer for Wadud – a diptych – is visceral, Swift’s spare, resonant riffs, Reid and Bolognesi joining underneath with a brooding, bowed riff.

They open Cantiere Orlando with neo-baroque elegance, then hit a spiky interlude and artfully bring the main theme back. They close with the liltingly anthemic waltz Last Night’s Vacation and then the showstopper Cultural Differences, shifting gears hard through minimalism, some atmospherics and then shivery, metal-tinged phrasing. There’s really nothing like this out there.

April 24, 2019 Posted by | Music, music, concert, review, Reviews | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Haunting, Serpentine Majesty with the Tomeka Reid Quartet at the Jewish Museum

Thursday night at the Jewish Museum, the Tomeka Reid Quartet limited their savagery to when they really needed to drive a point home. But when they unleashed their inner beasts, the results were sublime.

On one hand, the music swung like crazy, driven by the relentless pulse of bassist Jason Roebke and ever-more-ubiquitous drummer Tomas Fujiwara (who was in as trad mode as he ever gets). On the other, Reid’s compositions can be as dark, and frequently haunting, as they are kinetic and rooted in decades of swing tradition.

Guitarist Mary Halvorson brought her big hollowbody Guild. Was this going to be showcase of too-cool-for-school hardbop voicings? No way. She was a little more restrained than usual, but it wasn’t long before she worked up a murderous thicket of machete tremolo-picking. It would be several songs into the set before she hit her pedalboard and took the tonalities into Jabba the Hut’s outer space lounge. Otherwise, she anchored the songs with expansive series of chords, sparred with Reid, or let her enigmatic phrases linger during the set’s more brooding moments.

Reid also chose her spots. Conventional wisdom is that low-register instrumentalists have no fear of the dark side, and that’s certainly true of Reid, although most of  this set was pretty upbeat. She saved her menacing upward swipes, stark stygian chords and ghostly glissandos – as well as some droll theremin-like harmonics – for when she really needed them. Otherwise, her melody, whether bowed or plucked, swung close to the ground.

The night’s darkest number was a sort of a terse Big Lazy noir cinematic theme with pedaled bass, a cello melody, martial beat and a harried crescendo that more that hinted at cello metal. Another ominous tune embodied resonant, uneasy Wadada Leo Smith blues and starkly modal Amir ElSaffar tonalities, the trio of Reid, Halvorson and Roebke following a tense rubato path.

They opened with a spiky, New Orleans-flavored shuffle and closed with a wary, serpentine piece spiced with the bandleader’s ominous, modal cello trading against Halvorson’s judicious rises and falls, which was a frequent dynamic throughout the show. In between, other highlights included a tune that came across as loopy, dark soukous, along with a staggeredly enigmatic saloon-swing mini-epic, in addition to unexpected detours toward roots reggae, dub and early 80s Pat Metheny. Notwithstanding all the gravitas, everybody in the band seemed comfortable with throwing in an occasional rhythmic swipe for levity’s sake.

Reid’s next New York show is on May 23 at 8:30 PM at the new Stone as part of guitarist Joe Morris‘ quartet. The Bang on a Can organization, who booked this show as this month’s installment of their monthly series at the Jewish Museum, are putting on their annual ten-plus-hour marathon this May 13 starting at noon at NYU’s Skirball Center at LaGuardia and Washington Square South. Admission is free, but get there early if you’re going.

April 28, 2018 Posted by | concert, jazz, Live Events, Music, music, concert, New York City, review, Reviews | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment